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Weekly Agenda
1/6-1/10

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe

January 6-10, 2020

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What choices do authors make to develop plot and theme?
  • How are symbols in a text connect to theme?
  • How are central ideas conveyed across texts?

 

Monday 1/6/20

Lesson: Welcome back!

  • New Year Activity
  • SMART Goal Creation

Tuesday 1/7/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London

Wednesday 1/8/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Finish reading and annotating story
  • Work on close reading questions. Use in-text citations and complete sentences to support your answer.

Thursday 1/9/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Plot Chain: Activity
  • Write a summary of the story using the SWBST strategy.
  • Complete the Figurative Language activity
  • Review Figurative Language as a class
  • Begin “Explanatory Process: A Lesson in Preparedness”

Friday 1/10/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Setting Activity: Setting Creates Conflict—Complete the activity in groups of 3 or 4.
  • Each group will present their findings to the class.
  • When finished, work on the Cause and Effect page in your work book individually.

Have a great weekend!

1/13-1/17

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe

January 13-17, 2020

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What choices do authors make to develop plot and theme?
  • How are symbols in a text connect to theme?
  • How are central ideas conveyed across texts?

 

Monday 1/13/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London

  • Symbolism: “ICE”olation
    • Choose three symbols in the story that help to promote the theme of isolation
  • Paragraph response for title of the story

Tuesday 1/14/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London

  • Paired Non-Fiction: Compare and Contrast
    • Read news article as a class
    • Compare the little girl to the man in the story
    • Write about it: Reflection paragraph

Wednesday 1/15/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Irony Workshop
    • Review different types of irony as a class
    • Determine which sections of the text are which type of irony
    • Review as a class

Thursday 1/16/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Pros/Cons Activity
    • In groups, determine the pros and cons of each setting that you are assigned.
    • Complete the chart in your packet.
    • Discuss and share as a class

Friday 1/17/20

Lesson: “To Build a Fire” by Jack London—Continued

  • Text/Film Comparison
    • View the film as a class
    • Complete the guided viewing
    • Turn in packets at the end of the class period

Have a great weekend!

1/20-1/24

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe

January 20-24, 2020

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How can a text centuries old still speak to readers today?
  • What is the relationship between strength and adversity?
  • How far are you willing to go to fight for what you believe in?

Monday 1/20/20

NO SCHOOL: MLK DAY

Tuesday 1/21/20

Lesson: “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth

  • Background information
    • Read about the author
    • Read the piece as a class
    • Answer close reading questions in packet

Wednesday 1/22/20

Lesson: “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth—Continued

  • Digital Media Comparison and Analysis
    • View Kerri Washington’s commentary on the speech
    • Answer viewing questions with a partner

Thursday 1/23/20

Lesson: “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth—Continued

  • Rhetorical Style Analysis
    • Identify different rhetorical devices and techniques used in the speech.
    • Cite evidence from the speech
    • Explain the effect it gives the speech

Friday 1/24/20

Lesson: “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth—Continued

  • Creative Writing Assignment
    • Create a RAFT response to speech
    • Complete poem activity
    • Turn in packets when done

Have a great weekend!

1/27-1/31

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe

January 27-31, 2020

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What other choices do author’s make to develop plot and theme?
  • Under what circumstances would committing a crime be justifiable?
  • What drives gender roles and attitudes, and what is acceptable and not acceptable?

Monday 1/27/20

Lesson: Mark Twain—Intro

  • Mark Twain Biography Video
    • View video
    • Complete guided viewing activity
    • Discuss as a class

Tuesday 1/28/20

Lesson: Trifles—Introduction

  • “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell
    • Read play as a class
    • Discuss the plot as a class

Wednesday 1/29/20

Lesson: Trifles—Continued

  • Answer close reading questions
  • Direct Quote—Activity
    • Find quotes from male characters that reveal their sentiments about women.

Thursday 1/30/20

Lesson: Trifles—Continued

  • Poem Analysis
    • Read the poem “Sympathy”
    • Annotate
    • Answer close reading questions
  • Symbol Activity
    • Choose a theme from the list of themes on the board
    • Find a symbol that helps to support that theme in the play

Friday 1/31/20

Lesson: Trifles—Continued

  • Prompt Response:
    • In a fully developed paragraph, respond to the following: Is Mr. Wright really so wrong? We are told John Wright was not a bad man: “He didn’t drink, and kept his word . . . and paid his debts.” Minnie Wright’s murder of her husband would be condoned by feminist critics as a “defiance of patriarchy.” Was it a “crime” for Minnie to strangle her husband or simple justice?
  • Quilt Activity
    • Weave together a quilt of positivity

Have a great weekend!

2/3-2/7

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe

February 3-7, 2020

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How do authors shape characters?
  • What other choices do author’s make to develop plot and theme?
  • How far are you willing to go for love?
  • Can a person’s outlook on the afterlife affect his/her reaction to death and grieving?

Monday 2/3/20

Lesson: A Rose for Emily

  • Read the story as a class
  • Stop and discuss
  • Complete close reading questions with a partner

Tuesday 2/4/20

Lesson: A Rose for Emily—Continued

  • Plot chain activity
  • Theme activity: Discuss and complete

Wednesday 2/5/20

Lesson: A Rose for Emily—Continued

  • Elements of fiction scavenger hunt
  • Poem comparison
    • Read poem
    • Annotate
    • Answer close reading questions

Thursday 2/6/20

Lesson: Course Selection

  • Choose classes for next year!

Friday 2/7/20

Lesson: Course Selection

  • Choose classes for next year!

Have a great weekend!

2/10-2/14

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

February 10-14, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  •  How do authors shape characters?
  • What other choices do author’s make to develop plot and theme?
  • How far are you willing to go for love?
  • Can a person’s outlook on the afterlife affect his/her reaction to death and grieving?

Monday 2/10/19

Lesson: A Rose for Emily—Continued

  • Watch Video of “A Rose for Emily”  
  • Read “He Loved Lucy” as a class
  • Answer close reading questions with a partner
  • Turn in when finished

Tuesday 2/11/19

Lesson: Non-Fiction Text Comparison

  • Read non-fiction article as a class
  • Annotate
  • Discuss with a partner
  • Complete Venn Diagram of article and story “A Rose for Emily”
  • Turn in packets at the end of the class period

Wednesday 2/12/19

Lesson: Paired Informational Text Constructed Response

  • Login to Google Classroom
  • Find the assignment and respond
  • Response needs to be at least 500 words

Thursday 2/13/19 (Periods 1, 3, and 5)

Lesson: Gatsby Intro

  • Take “A Rose for Emily” Test
  • Watch the background informational video on F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby

Friday 2/14/19 (Periods 2, 4, and 6)

Lesson: Gatsby Intro

  • Take “A Rose for Emily” Test
  • Watch the background informational video on F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby

Have a great weekend!

2/17-2/21

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

February 17-21, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does a time period reflect literature?
  • How is theme developed in a text?
  • How does an author use literature to comment on a time period?

Monday 2/17/19

Lesson: President’s Day

  • NO SCHOOL

Tuesday 2/18/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Intro

  • Get books from bookstore
  • Take notes on what was happening in the US during the 20’s
  • Look at the setting and time period of The Great Gatsby

Wednesday 2/19/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Continued

  • Begin reading chapter 1
  • Complete close reading questions
  • Fill out setting map

Thursday 2/20/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Chapter 1

  • Complete close reading of chapter 1.
  • Annotate text
  • Answer questions connected to text
  • Construct one paragraph response to prompt

Friday 2/21/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Chapter 2

  • Read chapter 2 as a class
  • Complete close reading questions with a partner

Have a great weekend!

2/24-2/28

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

February 24-28, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does a time period reflect literature?
  • How is theme developed in a text?
  • How does an author use literature to comment on a time period?

Monday 2/24/19

Lesson: Utah Shakespeare Festival—Presentation

  • View the play production in the auditorium

Tuesday 2/25/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby— Chapter 3

  • Read chapter 3 as a class
  • Complete close reading questions
  • Discuss the text as a class

Wednesday 2/26/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Close Reading Questions

  • Finish questions for chapters 1-3
  • Discuss as a class

Thursday 2/27/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Chapter 4

  • Read the text as a class
  • Work on close reading questions

Friday 2/28/19

Lesson: The Great Gatsby—Chapter 5

  • Read the text as a class
  • Finish close reading questions.

Have a great weekend!