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Weekly Agenda
Week 1 8/1-8/2

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe  

July 31st-August 2nd, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Alliteration, Allusion, Assonance, Ballad, Consonance, Diction, Enjambment, Free Verse, Metaphor, Meter, Onomatopoeia, Rhythm, Simile, Stanza, Symbol, Theme, Tone, Verse

Monday

No School

 

Tuesday

No School

 

Wednesday

Lesson: Freshman Day

  • Welcome class of 2023!

 

Thursday

Lesson: First day of school!

  • Syllabus
    • Review classroom expectations
  • Review school policy
  • Supply list

 

Friday

Lesson: Growth Mindset

  • View the TED Talk “The Secret to Student Success”
  • Complete worksheet
  • Discuss the importance of Growth Mindset, and how it will affect your success in this course
  • Turn in signed syllabus sheets and TED Talk worksheets

Have a great weekend!

Week 2

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

August 5-9, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Alliteration, Allusion, Assonance, Ballad, Consonance, Diction, Enjambment, Free Verse, Metaphor, Meter, Onomatopoeia, Rhythm, Simile, Stanza, Symbol, Theme, Tone, Verse

Monday

Bell Work: Put together BW Binder and begin on first entry.

Lesson: Native American Research Project

  • Assign creation stories
  • Review the requirements of the project
  • Review the rubric for this project
  • Begin working on project

Tuesday

Lesson: Native American Research Project

  • Continue working on research project in class
  • Progress check-in

Wednesday

Lesson: Native American Research Project

  • Mini-Lesson on Works Cited page
  • Continue working on project
  • Progress Check-In

Thursday

Lesson: Native American Research Project

  • Last day to work on project in class
  • Review expectations of presentation
  • Continue working

Friday

Lesson: Native American Research Project Presentations

  • Review expectations of presentations
  • Present
  • Discuss the importance of Native American culture in our current society

Have a great weekend!

Week 3 8/12-8/16

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

August 12-16, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does literature reflect a time period?
  • What does an author do to persuade an audience?
  • Does it matter if you stand up for something even if your goal is not met?

Monday 8/12/19

Lesson: Finish Native American Presentations

  • Class discussion of Native American Cultures

Tuesday 8/13/19

Lesson: Junior Pre-Test

  • Review expectations of Pre-Test
  • Questions?
  • Use the entire class period to finish the Pre-Test

Wednesday 8/14/19

Lesson: Literary Terms Review

  • Take Literary Terms Review Quiz
  • Exchange quiz with a partner
  • Correct quizzes
  • Keep lists in your binder

Thursday 8/15/19

Lesson: Time Period PowerPoint

  • Create “Foldable” to record notes and to keep in your binder
  • View PPT and take guided notes about the specific time period that we will be studying
  • Keep notes in binder for periodic “Notes Check”

Friday 8/16/19

Quickwrite: “There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.” –Elie Wiesel

Do you agree with Wiesel’s statement? Does it matter if you protest even if nothing “gets done” or changed? Explain.

Lesson: Trail of Tears

  • View short introduction video
  • Discuss the events as a class
  • Connect the Quickwrite to events in the video. Did your answer change?

**Bell Work Binder Checks!! Make sure to leave your BW Binder in the classroom!**

Have a great weekend!

Week 4 8/19-8/23

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

August 19-23, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does literature reflect a time period?
  • What does an author do to persuade an audience?
  • Does it matter if you stand up for something even if your goal is not met?

Monday 8/19/19

Lesson: Picture Day!

  • We will take pictures today during English class.

Tuesday 8/20/19

Quickwrite: Quick Write: Have you ever been forced to leave something/someone/somewhere you loved? Why? How did you cope? How did it turn out?

Lesson: Trail of Tears—Seminal Texts

  • Andrew Jackson’s Annual Message
    • 1st Read-Through—Summarize (SWBST)
    • 2nd Read-Through—Words in Context
    • 3rd Read-Through—Comprehension Questions

Wednesday 8/21/19

Quickwrite: “There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.” –Elie Wiesel

Do you agree with Wiesel’s statement? Does it matter if you protest even if nothing “gets done” or changed? Explain.

Lesson: Trail of Tears—Seminal Texts

  • “Our Hearts Are Sickened” by Chief John Ross
    • 1st Read-Through—Summarize (SWBST)
    • 2nd Read-Through—Words in Context
    • 3rd Read-Through—Comprehension Questions

Thursday 8/22/19

Lesson: Trail of Tears—Seminal Texts

  • Discuss the two historical documents, and what was being addressed, as well as what devices were used in each.
  • Answer the close reading comprehension questions for both pieces. Turn in your work when finished.

Friday 8/23/19

Quote:

“If you don’t know history, you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree.” – Michael Crichton

Lesson: Trail of Tears—Seminal Texts

  • “An Indian Walks in Me” by Marilou Awiakta
    • Read poem as a class
    • Highlight text while reading
    • Discuss key points
    • Answer close reading questions
    • Turn in when finished

Have a great weekend!

Week 5 8/26-8/30

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

August 26-30, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does literature reflect a time period?
  • What does an author do to persuade an audience?
  • Does it matter if you stand up for something even if your goal is not met?

Monday 8/26/19

Lesson: Google Classroom Assignment

  • Login to google classroom and join Mrs. Wolfe’s class. Get the class code.
  • Complete the assignment and be sure to turn in by the due date: 8/27/19
  • If you have any questions, please ask.
  • Any work not finished in class will be homework.

Tuesday 8/27/19

Lesson: Ransom of Red Chief—Text and Film comparison

  • Begin watching film
  • Start viewing guide questions
  • Class discussion

Wednesday 8/28/19

Lesson: Ransom of Red Chief—Text and Film comparison

  • Finish watching film
  • Complete viewing guide questions
  • Class discussion
  • Turn in when finished

Thursday 8/29/19

Lesson: Study for End of Unit Quiz

  • Review terms, events, and vocabulary for quiz
  • Work as a class to complete study guide

Friday 8/30/19

Lesson: Quiz: Beginnings—1700

  • Turn in study guide before quiz
  • Take quiz
  • Work on any missing work after quiz

 

Have a great weekend!

Week 6 9/2-9/6

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

September 2-6, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How does literature reflect a time period?
  • What does an author do to persuade an audience?

Monday 9/2/19

Lesson: Labor Day—No School

Tuesday 9/3/19

Lesson: Foldable Notes—1700-1800

  • Create note booklets
  • Take guided notes in booklet
  • Keep in binder

Wednesday 9/4/19

Lesson: Benjamin Franklin: Biography

  • View biography about Benjamin Franklin
  • Record 10 facts
  • Write a summary paragraph explaining what his contributions were to the United States.
  • Turn in when finished.

Thursday 9/5/19

Lesson: Benjamin Franklin—Autobiography Excerpt

  • Read the excerpt as a class
  • Annotate
  • Write a summary about the text: Use the SWBST method

Friday 9/6/19

Lesson: Benjamin Franklin—Autobiography Continued

  • Finish annotating text
  • Answer text-dependent questions: Use complete sentences and cite the text to support your answers.

Have a great weekend!

Week 7 9/9-9/13

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

September 9-13, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What makes people’s definition of success differ?
  • How do authors use compare/contrast to help readers understand information?
  • What can be gained from an autobiography?
  • How is an autobiography and modern blog similar?
  • What are some traits of success?

Monday 9/9/19

Lesson: Organ’s Article

  • Read the text aloud as a class
  • Read the article again, individually. Annotate the text.
  • Create a summary using the SWBST method.
  • Answer the text based questions related to the article
  • Use complete sentences and cite the text to support your answer

Tuesday 9/10/19

Lesson: Power Outage

  • School Cancellation

Wednesday 9/11/19

Lesson: Organ’s Article—Continued

  • Complete Venn Diagram of two articles.
  • Staple to work from Franklin article and turn in

Exit Ticket: Students will respond to the essential questions tying all the information that we have read and discussed together today.

Thursday 9/12/19 (Periods 1, 3, and 5)

Lesson: Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty” Speech

  • Review notes from yesterday
  • Begin reading speech
  • Listen to the speech as we annotate
  • Use context clues to define the following:
    • Sentiment
    • Insidious
    • Formidable
    • Invincible
    • Presides
  • Get in groups to answer the task cards
  • Share answers found as a class
  • Read the poem “I am the People, the Mob”

Friday 9/13/19 (Periods 2, 4, and 6)

Lesson: Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty” Speech

  • Review notes from yesterday
  • Begin reading speech
  • Listen to the speech as we annotate
  • Use context clues to define the following:
    • Sentiment
    • Insidious
    • Formidable
    • Invincible
    • Presides
  • Get in groups to answer the task cards
  • Share answers found as a class
  • Read the poem “I am the People, the Mob”

Have a great weekend!

Week 8 9/16-9/20

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

September 16-20, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What makes people’s definition of success differ?
  • How do authors use compare/contrast to help readers understand information?
  • What can be gained from an autobiography?
  • How is an autobiography and modern blog similar?
  • What are some traits of success?

Monday 9/16/19

Lesson: Patrick Henry Speech—Continued

  • Patrick Henry “Ethos, Pathos, Logos” Activity
  • Work with a partner to complete the activity.

Tuesday 9/17/19

Lesson: Patrick Henry Speech—Continued

  • “I am the People, the Mob” Poem
    • Read the poem
    • Answer the close reading questions on a separate sheet of paper
  • “Taking a Stand” activity
    • Liberty bell decoration.
  • “Applying Persuasive Appeals”
    • Choose a topic of which you are passionate.
    • Write a fully developed paragraph in which you take a stand for your issue. Use ethos, pathos, and logos.

Wednesday 9/18/19

Lesson: “Soul Surfer” Film

  • Begin watching “Soul Surfer”
  • Begin working on the guided viewing activity.

Thursday 9/19/19

Lesson: “Soul Surfer” Film—Continued

  • Continue watching “Soul Surfer” Film
  • Continue working on the guided viewing activity

Friday 9/20/19

Lesson: “Soul Surfer” Film—Continued

  • Finish the film “Soul Surfer” film
  • Complete the guided viewing activity
  • Turn in when finished
  • Begin working on the final movie activity
  • Turn in when finished.

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Week 9 9/23-9/27

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

September 23-27, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What are the characteristics of a narrative?
  • What is the purpose of a narrative?
  • How does a writer tell his/her story?
  • How can a person overcome obstacles?

Monday 9/23/19

Lesson: Work Day

  • There are 9 days left in the semester, use this class time to get caught up on any missing assignments.

Tuesday 9/24/19

Lesson: R.A.C.E. Activity

  • Take guided notes on the response strategy
  • Do a practice activity sample as a class
  • Complete the other samples individually
  • Class discussion: How will this strategy help you?

Wednesday 9/25/19

Lesson: Olaudah Equiano—Biography

  • Watch the biography
  • Record ten facts
  • Write a one paragraph summary of the information given

Thursday 9/26/19

Lesson: Olaudah Equiano—Narrative

  • Read the narrative
  • Annotate
  • Define terms
  • Write a summary using the SWBST method

Friday 9/27/19

Lesson: Equiano Narrative—Continued

  • Answer the close reading questions using complete sentences
  • Restate the phrases in your own words.

Have a great weekend!

Week 10 9/30-10/4

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

September 30-October 4, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What are the characteristics of a narrative?
  • What is the purpose of a narrative?
  • How does a writer tell his/her story?
  • How can a person overcome obstacles?

Monday 9/30/19

Lesson: Olaudah Equiano—Paired Poetry

  • Read the poem “Refugee in America”
  • Annotate the poem
  • Answer the close reading questions using the R.A.C.E. Strategy

Tuesday 10/1/19

Lesson: “Quiet Strength” Tony Dungy—Memoir

  • Read the chapter excerpt as a class
  • Annotate memoir
  • Write a summary using the SWBST strategy

Wednesday 10/2/19

Lesson: “Quiet Strength” Tony Dungy—Memoir

  • Answer the close reading questions using the R.A.C.E. strategy.
  • Turn in your packets when finished

Thursday 10/3/19

Lesson: Singin’ in the Rain—How can a person overcome obstacles?

  • Review the essential questions for this unit.
  • Compare them to the film
  • Write a compare/contrast paragraph

Friday 10/4/19

Lesson: Singin’ in the Rain—How can a person overcome obstacles?

  • Continue watching the film
  • Finish paragraphs and turn in.

Have a great weekend!

Week 11 10/14-18

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

October 14-18, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

Monday 10/14/19

Lesson: Romanticism and Dark Romanticism Genre

  • Take notes on the new genre
  • Discuss new works and authors as a class

Tuesday 10/15/19

Lesson: “What Science Tells Us About Why We Lie” Article

  • Read the article
  • Annotate in detail
  • Define the terms
  • Write a summary of the article using the SWBST strategy

Wednesday 10/16/19

Lesson: “What Science Tells Us About Why We Lie” Article—Continued

  •  

 

Thursday 10/17/19

Lesson: “Tell the Truth…” Poem Analysis

  • Read the poem
  • Annotate the poem
  • Answer the close reading questions
  • Turn in packet when finished

** Truth packets due today!!

Friday 10/18/19

Lesson: American Legends: The Basis of Our History

  • View the film
  • Write a one paragraph summary of the film.

Have a great weekend!

 

 

 

 

Week 12 10/21-10/25

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

October 21-25, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How do authors shape characters?
  • What other choices do authors make to develop plot and theme?

Monday 10/21/19

Lesson: Sub: Edgar Allan Poe—Biography and Quiz

  • View the biography of the American author Edgar Allan Poe
  • Complete the in-class quiz
  • Turn in when complete

Tuesday 10/22/19

Lesson:  The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

  • Begin reading text
  • Record characters and descriptions of the characters
  • Class discussion  

Wednesday 10/23/19

Lesson: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving—Continued

  • Continue reading
  • Complete the “Matters the Text Leaves Uncertain” Activity
  • Discuss how the text ended

Thursday 10/24/19

Lesson: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving—Continued

Warm-Up Activity: Human Plot Chart

  • Reading Comprehension Questions: Divide into groups and answer using the R.A.C.E. strategy.
  • Discuss answers found as a class.
  • Record answers in your booklets.

Friday 10/25/19

Lesson: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving—Continued

  • Real World Text Connection— “History of the Jack O’ Lanterns”
  • Read and annotate text
  • Use textual evidence from both sources to answer questions.
  • Share as a group and record answers.

Have a great weekend!

Week 13 10/31-11/1

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

October 28-November 1, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • How do authors shape characters?
  • What other choices do authors make to develop plot and theme?

Monday 10/28/19

Lesson: History of the Jack O’ Lantern

  • Read non-fiction text
  • Annotate
  • Answer close reading questions

Tuesday 10/29/19

Lesson:  History of the Jack O’ Lantern—Continued

  • Finish Questions
  • Review test questions with a partner

Wednesday 10/30/19

Lesson: Sleepy Hollow—Argumentative Prompt

  • Respond to the prompt in a short essay
  • Remember to use the R.A.C.E. strategy

Thursday 10/31/19

Lesson: Sleepy Hollow: Movie

  • Watch the movie as a class
  • Take notes on how the movie stays true to the text, and how it deviates.
  • Discuss as a class

Friday 11/1/19

  • No School—Teacher In-Service Day

Have a great weekend!

Week 14 11/4-11/8

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

November 4-8, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What themes are shared across genres?
  • What limitations and affordances does each genre offer on a topic or theme?
  • How do writers reflect social and political issues?
  • What is our responsibility to the environment?
  • What can nature do for us; what can we do for nature?

Monday 11/4/19

Lesson: Transcendentalism—Unit Introduction

Quickwrite: “Unnatural deeds do breed unnatural troubles”—William Shakespeare.

What does this quote mean? What are examples of unnatural deeds…unnatural troubles?

  • Watch the short video “Weird Weather”  
  • Answer questions and complete diagram with your groups.

Tuesday 11/5/19

Lesson:  Transcendentalism—Intro

  • View PowerPoint of Transcendentalism
  • Discuss key topics as a class
  • Complete guided notes  

Wednesday 11/6/19

Lesson: Walden Text

  • Complete the picture prompt
  • Begin reading Walden text
  • Stop and discuss as a class
  • Annotate as we read

Thursday 11/7/19

Lesson: Walden Text—Continued

  • Continue reading Walden text
  • Stop and discuss as a class
  • Annotate as we read
  • Close reading questions

Friday 11/8/19

Lesson: Lesson: Walden Text—Continued

  • Continue reading Walden text
  • Stop and discuss as a class
  • Annotate as we read
  • Close reading questions

Have a great weekend!

Week 15 11/11-11/15

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

November 11-15, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What themes are shared across genres?
  • What limitations and affordances does each genre offer on a topic or theme?
  • How do writers reflect social and political issues?
  • What is our responsibility to the environment?
  • What can nature do for us; what can we do for nature?

Monday 11/11/19

No School—Veteran’s Day

 

Tuesday 11/12/19

Lesson:  Non-Fiction—Science Journal

  • Read the article as a class
  • Annotate as we read
  • Answer close reading questions as a group

Wednesday 11/13/19

Lesson: Compare Non-Fiction to Walden

  • Complete the graphic organizer for the two texts
  • Share findings with the class—How are these texts similar? How are they different?

Thursday 11/14/19

Lesson: The World Is Too Much With Us—William Wordsworth

  • Read the poem as a class
  • Jigsaw Activity: Dissect and discuss
  • Answer close reading questions with a partner
  • Unlocking Figurative Language—Activity

Friday 11/15/19

Lesson: Review: Texts and Upcoming Essay

  • Tweet for Me: Summary Activity
  • Answer the questions of reflection as a class
  • Review texts and essay prompt, rubric, writing process, and due dates.

Have a great weekend!

11/18-11/22

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

November 18-22, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What themes are shared across genres?
  • What limitations and affordances does each genre offer on a topic or theme?
  • How do writers reflect social and political issues?
  • What is our responsibility to the environment?
  • What can nature do for us; what can we do for nature?

Monday 11/18/19

Lesson: Research Essay: Consumerism in America

  • Review the prompt: Consumerism, the consumption of goods, is a complex issue that has wide social and environmental implications. Many people say that we now live in a consumer society where money and possessions are given too much importance. Others believe that consumer culture has played a vital role in improving our lives.  Has consumerism affected us in a negative or positive way?  In a fully developed argumentative essay, prove your viewpoint on this issue.
  • Begin researching for your argumentative essay.
  • Begin working on source notecards.

Tuesday 11/19/19

Lesson:  Research Essay: Consumerism in America—Continued

  • Review the requirements for an argumentative thesis statement.
  • Begin formulating your thesis statement on the research that you did yesterday.
  • There will be a notecard and thesis statement check-in tomorrow at the beginning of class.

**HOMEWORK**

  • Finish your thesis statement and notecards tonight.

Wednesday 11/20/19

Lesson: Research Essay: Consumerism in America—Continued

  • Notecard and thesis statement check-in
  • Begin working on outline for your argumentative essay
  • Progress check-in with Mrs. Wolfe

Thursday 11/21/19

Lesson: Research Essay: Consumerism in America—Continued

  • Continue Drafting
  • Rough draft needs to be complete for class tomorrow

**HOMEWORK**

  • Complete your rough draft

Friday 11/22/19

Lesson: Research Essay: Consumerism in America—Continued

  • Peer review: Get with a partner to complete the peer review activity
  • Apply the feedback given to you by your partner.
  • Continue writing.

Have a great weekend!

11/25-11/29

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

November 25-29, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What themes are shared across genres?
  • What limitations and affordances does each genre offer on a topic or theme?
  • How do writers reflect social and political issues?
  • What is our responsibility to the environment?
  • What can nature do for us; what can we do for nature?

Monday 11/25/19

Lesson: Research Essay—Continued

  • You will continue to work on your research essay.
  • Mrs. Wolfe will check in with your progress.

Tuesday 11/26/19

Lesson:  Research Essay—Continued

  • You will finish your research essay today. You will turn in two versions: a printed copy for your folder, and a version submitted on Google Classroom. These are due at the end of the class period.

Wednesday 11/27/19- Friday 11/29/19

  • NO SCHOOL: THANKSGIVING BREAK

Have a great weekend!

12/2-12/6

English 11 Agenda

Mrs. Wolfe 

December 2-6, 2019

Unit: American Literature

Key Vocabulary: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Paradox, Allegory, Allusion, Foil Character, Repetition, Imagery, Metaphor, Theocracy, Lyric, Extended Metaphor, Anaphora, Aphorism, Heroic Couplet, Epistle, Iambic Pentameter, Analogy, Rhetorical Question, Propaganda, Bandwagon, Testimonial, Imagery, Sensory Details, Hyperbole, Free Verse, Personification, Symbol, Local Color Writing, Irony, Connotation, Denotation, Point of View, Mood, Tone, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Protagonist, Antagonist, Theme, Exposition, Man v. Man, Man v. Nature, Man v. Himself, Man v. Society, Man v. Machine, Man v. Supernatural

Essential Questions:

  • What themes are shared across genres?
  • What limitations and affordances does each genre offer on a topic or theme?
  • How do writers reflect social and political issues?
  • What is our responsibility to the environment?
  • What can nature do for us; what can we do for nature?

Monday 12/2/19

Lesson: Wall-E vs. Walden

  • View first 30 minutes of the film Wall-E
  • Compare the themes of the film to the themes found within Walden
  • Discuss as a class
  • Begin working on close viewing questions.

Tuesday 12/3/19

Lesson:  Wall-E vs. Walden—Continued

  • Continue watching film
  • Continue working on close viewing questions

Wednesday 12/4/19

Lesson: Wall-E vs. Walden—Continued

  • Finish watching film
  • Complete the close viewing questions

Thursday 12/5/19

Lesson: In-Class Essay

  • Respond to the following prompt:
    • The movie Wall-E illustrates a dystopian futuristic reality for humanity. How does the film connect with and fulfill Thoreau’s and Wordsworth’s ideas on the environment and our role in it? Use specific examples and citations from all sources to support your ideas.
  • You will have the entire class period to complete this.

Friday 12/6/19

Lesson: Wall-E, Walden, and Wordsworth

  • Use this class period to complete all aspects of the packet.
  • This packet is due at the end of the class period.

Have a great weekend!